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Open Access Research

Evaluation of antiaggregatory activity of flavonoid aglycone series

Mirza Bojić1, Željko Debeljak12, Maja Tomičić3, Marica Medić-Šarić1* and Siniša Tomić4

Author affiliations

1 University of Zagreb, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, A. Kovačića 1, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia

2 Department of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics, CHC Osijek, J. Huttlera 4, 31000 Osijek, Croatia

3 Croatian Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Department of Platelet and Leukocyte Immunology, Petrova 3, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia

4 Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices of Croatia, Ksaverska cesta 4, Zagreb, Croatia

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Citation and License

Nutrition Journal 2011, 10:73  doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-73

Published: 11 July 2011

Abstract

Background

Among natural compounds, present in every day diet, flavonoids have shown beneficial effect in prevention of cardiovascular diseases that can be attributed, at least partially to the described antiaggregatory activity i.e. antiplatelet effects of flavonoids. Due to the ever increasing pharmacological interest in antiplatelet agents a systematic experimental evaluation of large flavonoid series is needed.

Methods

A set of thirty flavonoid aglycones has been selected for the evaluation. All measurements of aggregation were done under standardized and firmly controlled in vitro conditions. The whole blood samples, multiple platelet functional analyzer and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) as a weak agonist of aggregation were selected for this purpose.

Results

The results were expressed as minimal concentration of flavonoid that can significantly lower the platelet aggregation compared to the corresponding untreated sample (minimal antiaggregatory concentration - MINaAC). All analyzed flavonoids exhibited antiaggregatory activity MINaAC ranging from 0.119 μM to 122 μM, while the most potent representatives were 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (0.119 μM) and syringetin (0.119 μM).

Conclusions

Measurable antiplatelet activity established at submicromolar flavonoid concentrations suggests that even a dietary consumption of some flavonoids can make an impact on in vivo aggregation of platelets. These findings also point out a therapeutical potential of some flavonoids.