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Bean and rice meals reduce postprandial glycemic response in adults with type 2 diabetes: a cross-over study

Sharon V Thompson1, Donna M Winham2* and Andrea M Hutchins3

Author affiliations

1 Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR, 97239, USA

2 Howell Research, Associates, LLC, P.O. Box 1010, Queen Creek, AZ 85142, USA

3 Department of Health Sciences, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO, 80918, USA

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Citation and License

Nutrition Journal 2012, 11:23  doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-23

Published: 11 April 2012

Abstract

Background

Around the world, beans and rice are commonly consumed together as a meal. With type 2 diabetes increasing, the effect of this traditional diet pattern on glycemic response has not been studied fully.

Methods

We evaluated the glycemic response of bean and rice traditional meals compared to rice alone in adults with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men and women with type 2 diabetes controlled by metformin (n = 14) or diet/exercise (n = 3) aged 35–70 years participated in the randomized 4 × 4 crossover trial. The white long grain rice control, pinto beans/rice, black beans/rice, red kidney beans/rice test meals, matched for 50 grams of available carbohydrate, were consumed at breakfast after a 12 hour fast. Capillary blood glucose concentrations at baseline and at 30 minute intervals up to 180 minutes postprandial were collected. MANOVA for repeated measures established glucose differences between treatments. Paired t tests identified differences between bean types and the rice control following a significant MANOVA.

Results

Postprandial net glucose values were significantly lower for the three bean/rice treatments in contrast to the rice control at 90, 120 and 150 minutes. Incremental area under the curve values were significantly lower for the pinto and black bean/rice meals compared to rice alone, but not for kidney beans.

Conclusions

Pinto, dark red kidney and black beans with rice attenuate the glycemic response compared to rice alone. Promotion of traditional foods may provide non-pharmaceutical management of type 2 diabetes and improve dietary adherence with cultural groups.

Trial registration

Clinical Trials number NCT01241253

Keywords:
Beans; Type 2 diabetes; Traditional diets; Glycemic response