Table 3

Contribution of the top 10 sources of saturated fat in the US diet to nutrient intakes
Top 10 sources of saturated fat SFAa MUFAb PUFAc Micronutrients and fiber* % total intake
% total intake
Cheese 16.5 6.7 1.5 Calcium 21.0
Vitamin B12 6.6
Phosphorus 11.4
Vitamin A 9.2
Sodium 7.6
Zinc 7.5
Riboflavin 5.2
Beef 8.5 8.8 1.2 Vitamin B12 18.6
Iron 6.5
Zinc 20.1
Niacin 8.8
Vitamin B6 8.2
Phosphorus 6.3
Milk 8.3 3.3 1.1 Vitamin D 49.5
Calcium 25.3
Potassium 11.6
Vitamin B12 17.1
Riboflavin 16.5
Vitamin A 16.1
Phosphorus 14.4
Magnesium 7.9
Zinc 7.0
Other fats and oils 8.2 10.1 11.4 Vitamin E 5.5
Frankfurters, sausages, luncheon meats 6.9 7.8 3.3 Sodium 6.7
Cakes, cookies, quick bread, pastry, pie 6.1 9.0 8.8 Fiber 5.1
Iron 6.2
Folate 5.9
Vitamin E 6.6
Thiamin 6.0
Margarine & butter 5.8 6.0 6.9 Vitamin A 8.2
Vitamin E 6.5
Milk desserts 5.1 2.1 0.7
Poultry 4.2 5.8 6.3 Niacin 15.1
Vitamin B6 9.1
Phosphorus 6.6
Zinc 6.0
Crackers, popcorn, pretzels, chips 4.0 5.5 10.9 Fiber 6.3
Vitamin E 9.4
Magnesium 5.3

*Micronutrients and fiber are shown when the food contributes ≥ 5% of the total daily intake. Micronutrients recognized by the 2010 DGA as nutrients of public health concern are calcium, vitamin D, potassium and fiber, and nutrients identified as those to encourage for specific subpopulations are vitamin B12, iron and folate. Folate is reported as Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE).

aSaturated fatty acids (SFA) include 4:0, 6:0, 8:0, 10:0, 12:0, 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0.

bMonounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) include 16:1, 18:1, 20:1, and 22:1.

cPolyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) include 18:2, 18:3, 18:4, 20:4, 20:5n-3 (EPA), 22:5n-3 (DPA), and 22:6n-3 (DHA).

Huth et al.

Huth et al. Nutrition Journal 2013 12:116   doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-116

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