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Fermented milk improves glucose metabolism in exercise-induced muscle damage in young healthy men

Masayo Iwasa1, Wataru Aoi1*, Keitaro Mune1, Haruka Yamauchi1, Kaori Furuta1, Shota Sasaki1, Kazuya Takeda2, Kiyomi Harada1, Sayori Wada1, Yasushi Nakamura2, Kenji Sato2 and Akane Higashi1

Author Affiliations

1 Laboratory of Health Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5 Hangi-cho Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan

2 Laboratory of Food Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5 Hangi-cho Shimogamo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan

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Nutrition Journal 2013, 12:83  doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-83

Published: 16 June 2013

Abstract

Background

This study investigated the effect of fermented milk supplementation on glucose metabolism associated with muscle damage after acute exercise in humans.

Methods

Eighteen healthy young men participated in each of the three trials of the study: rest, exercise with placebo, and exercise with fermented milk. In the exercise trials, subjects carried out resistance exercise consisting of five sets of leg and bench presses at 70–100% 12 repetition maximum. Examination beverage (fermented milk or placebo) was taken before and after exercise in double-blind method. On the following day, we conducted an analysis of respiratory metabolic performance, blood collection, and evaluation of muscle soreness.

Results

Muscle soreness was significantly suppressed by the consumption of fermented milk compared with placebo (placebo, 14.2 ± 1.2 score vs. fermented milk, 12.6 ± 1.1 score, p < 0.05). Serum creatine phosphokinase was significantly increased by exercise, but this increase showed a tendency of suppression after the consumption of fermented milk. Exercise significantly decreased the respiratory quotient (rest, 0.88 ± 0.01 vs. placebo, 0.84 ± 0.02, p < 0.05), although this decrease was negated by the consumption of fermented milk (0.88 ± 0.01, p < 0.05). Furthermore, exercise significantly reduced the absorption capacity of serum oxygen radical (rest, 6.9 ± 0.4 μmol TE/g vs. placebo, 6.0 ± 0.3 μmol TE/g, p < 0.05), although this reduction was not observed with the consumption of fermented milk (6.2 ± 0.3 μmol TE/g).

Conclusion

These results suggest that fermented milk supplementation improves glucose metabolism and alleviates the effects of muscle soreness after high-intensity exercise, possibly associated with the regulation of antioxidant capacity.

Keywords:
Lactobacillus helveticus; Delayed-onset muscle damage; Inflammation; Oxidative stress; Antioxidant