Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Nutrition Journal and BioMed Central.

Open Access Short report

Television viewing and sleep are associated with overweight among urban and semi-urban South Indian children

Rebecca Kuriyan1*, Swarnarekha Bhat2, Tinku Thomas1, Mario Vaz3 and Anura V Kurpad1

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Nutrition, St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore 560034, India

2 Department of Paediatrics, St. John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore 560034, India

3 Division of Public Health, St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore 560034, India

For all author emails, please log on.

Nutrition Journal 2007, 6:25  doi:10.1186/1475-2891-6-25

Published: 20 September 2007

Abstract

Background

Childhood obesity is an emerging problem in urban Indian children and increases in childhood overweight and obesity may be major contributors to the adult obesity epidemic. Thus, identifying potential risk factors for childhood obesity and formulating early interventions is crucial in the management of the obesity epidemic. The present study was aimed at evaluating dietary and physical activity patterns as determinants of overweight in a sample of children.

Methods

Five hundred and ninety eight children aged 6–16 years, visiting St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore City, India for minor complaints or routine checkups were recruited into the study. These children were studied for their physical activity patterns, sleep duration, sedentary habits and eating behaviours as potential determinants of overweight.

Results

Decreased duration of sleep and increased television viewing were significantly associated with overweight. Among the eating behaviours, increased consumption of fried foods was significantly associated with overweight.

Conclusion

Our data suggests that duration of sleep, television viewing and consumption of fried foods may be significant factors that contribute to overweight. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings.