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Open Access Research

Weight loss in individuals with metabolic syndrome given DASH diet counseling when provided a low sodium vegetable juice: a randomized controlled trial

Sonia F Shenoy1*, Walker SC Poston2, Rebecca S Reeves3, Alexandra G Kazaks4, Roberta R Holt1, Carl L Keen15, Hsin Ju Chen1, C Keith Haddock2, Barbara L Winters6, Chor San H Khoo6 and John P Foreyt3

Author affiliations

1 Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, USA

2 Institute for Biobehavioral Health Research, National Development and Research Institutes (NDRI), Leawood, Kansas, USA

3 Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA

4 Department of Nutrition and Exercise Science, Bastyr University, Kenmore, Washington, USA

5 Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Davis, USA

6 Campbell Soup Company, Camden, New Jersey, USA

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Citation and License

Nutrition Journal 2010, 9:8  doi:10.1186/1475-2891-9-8

Published: 23 February 2010

Abstract

Background

Metabolic syndrome, a constellation of metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, is one of the fastest growing disease entities in the world. Weight loss is thought to be a key to improving all aspects of metabolic syndrome. Research studies have suggested benefits from diets rich in vegetables and fruits in helping individuals reach and achieve healthy weights.

Objective

To evaluate the effects of a ready to serve vegetable juice as part of a calorie-appropriate Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet in an ethnically diverse population of people with Metabolic Syndrome on weight loss and their ability to meet vegetable intake recommendations, and on their clinical characteristics of metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, triglycerides, HDL, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure).

A secondary goal was to examine the impact of the vegetable juice on associated parameters, including leptin, vascular adhesion markers, and markers of the oxidative defense system and of oxidative stress.

Methods

A prospective 12 week, 3 group (0, 8, or 16 fluid ounces of low sodium vegetable juice) parallel arm randomized controlled trial. Participants were requested to limit their calorie intake to 1600 kcals for women and 1800 kcals for men and were educated on the DASH diet. A total of 81 (22 men & 59 women) participants with Metabolic Syndrome were enrolled into the study. Dietary nutrient and vegetable intake, weight, height, leptin, metabolic syndrome clinical characteristics and related markers of endothelial and cardiovascular health were measured at baseline, 6-, and 12-weeks.

Results

There were significant group by time interactions when aggregating both groups consuming vegetable juice (8 or 16 fluid ounces daily). Those consuming juice lost more weight, consumed more Vitamin C, potassium, and dietary vegetables than individuals who were in the group that only received diet counseling (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

The incorporation of vegetable juice into the daily diet can be a simple and effective way to increase the number of daily vegetable servings. Data from this study also suggest the potential of using a low sodium vegetable juice in conjunction with a calorie restricted diet to aid in weight loss in overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome.