Table 1

Randomized controlled HAES studies reported in peer-reviewed journals

Investigation

Group typea (n)

Population

Number of treatment sessions

Follow-up (number of weeks post treatment)

Attrition

Improvements

Decre-ments


Physio-logic

Health behaviors

Psycho-social


Provencher, et al., 2009[17] and 2007[20]

HAES (n = 48); social support (n = 48); control (n = 48)

Overweight and obese women

15

26

8%;

19%;

21%

Not evaluated

Eating behaviors

Not evaluated

None


Bacon et al, 2005 [11] and 2002[19]

HAES (n = 39); diet (n = 39)

Obese women, chronic dieters

30

52

8%;

42%

LDL, systolic blood pressure

Activity, binge eating

Self esteem, depression, body dissatisfact-ion, body image, interoceptive awareness

None


Rapaport et al., 2000[16]

Modified cognitive-behavioral treatment (n= 37); cognitive behavioral treatment (n= 38)

Overweight and obese women

10

52

16%;

16%

Total cholesterolb, LDL cholesterolb, systolic blood pressureb, diastolic blood pressureb

Activityb, dietary qualityb

Emotional well-beingb, distressb

None


Ciliska, 1998[12]

Psycho-educational (n = 29); education only (n = 26), waitlist control (n = 23)

Obese women

12

52

14%;

23%;

41%

Diastolic blood pressure

Binge eating

Self-esteem, body dissatisfact-ion, depression

None


Goodrick et al., 1998[13]

Nondiet (n = 62); diet (n = 65); wait-list control (n = 58)

Overweight and obese women, binge-eaters

50

78

Not reported

Not evaluated

Binge-eating, exerciseb

Not evaluated

None


Tanco, et al., 1998[14]

Cognitive group treatment (n = 20); weight loss (n = 21); waitlist control (n = 19)

Obese women

8

26

10%;

10%;

32%

Not evaluated

Not evaluated

Depression, anxiety, eating-related psycho-pathology, perception of self-control

None


a HAES group listed first and in bold. (The names reflect those used in the publication.)

b Improvement in HAES group, but not statistically different from the control.

Bacon and Aphramor Nutrition Journal 2011 10:9   doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-9

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