Table 3

Vitamin D supplementation by men and women aged 25–85 in selected health risk groups
Number of Vitamin D Sources1
Unwtd None 1 Source ≥ 2 Sources
N Wtd. % Wtd. % Wtd. %
    Obese
(BMI ≥30)2
Women
 All 2324 40.2 36.8 23.0
 WhiteNH 1463 34.4 38.9 26.7
 Black 290 47.4* 39.4 12.9*
 Latino 333 55.0* 29.9 15.1*
Men
 All 1707 51.2 41.5 7.3
 WhiteNH 1164 47.9 44.9 7.1
 Black 131 49.0 41.4 9.5
 Latino 234 60.2* 32.7 7.1
    Diabetic
2
Women
 All 885 37.3 36.2 26.5
 WhiteNH 490 30.9 38.5 30.5
 Black 108 48.0* 41.6 12.4*
 Latino 121 54.1* 27.5 18.4*
Men
 All 1125 49.4 41.2 9.4
 WhiteNH 685 45.3 44.0 10.6
 Black 96 50.4 36.1 13.5
 Latino 129 60.3* 37.5 2.2*
    Hypertensive
Women
 All 3169 33.0 36.6 32.0
 WhiteNH 2094 28.8 35.8 35.3
 Black 316 39.4* 44.0 16.6*
 Latino 252 41.5* 34.5 24.0*
 Filipino 225 39.7* 35.5 24.8*
 Chinese 101 29.5 32.7 37.7
Men
 All 3091 46.7 43.4 9.9
 WhiteNH 2099 43.9 46.0 10.1
 Black 241 47.1 44.3 8.6
 Latino 246 56.3* 33.2 10.5
 Filipino 183 46.0 44.2 9.8
 Chinese 112 52.5 37.6 9.9

Unwtd. N = Actual subgroup sample size. Wtd. % = Respondent data weighted to the age, gender, and geographic composition of the health plan membership at time of the survey.

1 Sources of vitamin D: Calcium with D, multivitamin, singular D, or D in another combination. At the time of the survey, each of these sources generally contained contained 400 IU of vitamin D2.

2 Numbers of Filipino and Chinese women and men in risk group too small to use for estimates.

* Differs significantly from White nonHispanics at p<.05.

Gordon et al.

Gordon et al. Nutrition Journal 2012 11:104   doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-104

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