Table 2

Iron intake at mid-pregnancy according to intake of supplements and total iron intake levels at mid-pregnancy1
All subjects (n =337) Supplement users (n =97) Non-supplement users (n =240)
n (%) Mean ± SD n (%) Mean ± SD n (%) Mean ± SD
Food,3 mg 12.5 ± 3.9 13.0 ± 3.9 12.4 ± 3.8
Supplements,4 mg 18.4 ± 38.8 63.8 ± 48.3 -
Total iron intake5, mg 30.9 ± 39.2 76.9 ± 48.5a2 12.4 ± 3.8b
 < 24 256 (76.0) 12.6 ± 3.9 18 (18.6) 17.9 ± 4.12a 238 (99.2) 12.2 ± 3.6b
 24 ~ < 45 18 (5.3) 33.9 ± 6.2 16 (16.5) 34.8 ± 5.9a 2 (0.8) 26.8 ± 3.5a
 ≥ 45 63 (18.7) 104.4 ± 37.4 63 (64.9) 104.4 ± 37.4 0
 1st tertile (< 11.49) 112 (33.3) 9.3 ± 1.7 1 (1.0) - 111 (46.3) 9.2 ± 1.7
 2nd tertile (11.49 ~ 17.04) 113 (33.5) 14.0 ± 1.6 8 (8.3) 15.1 ± 1.7a 105 (43.8) 13.9 ± 1.5b
 3rd tertile (>17.04) 112 (33.2) 69.7 ± 48.7 88 (90.7) 83.2 ± 46.4a 24 (10.0) 20.2 ± 3.0b

1 Values are mean ± SD or n (%).

2 Significantly different by student’s t-test; Values with different superscript letters within a row are significantly different between supplement uses and non-supplement users (P < 0.05).

3 Iron intake from food sources only.

4 Iron intake from supplement sources only.

5 Total iron intake from both food and supplement sources.

Hwang et al.

Hwang et al. Nutrition Journal 2013 12:38   doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-38

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